Author Archives: Mike

DocShell in a Nutshell – Part 2: The Wonder Years (1999 – 2004)

When I first announced that I was going to be looking at the roots of DocShell, and how it has changed over the years, I thought I was going to be leafing through a lot of old CVS commits in order to see what went on before the switch to Mercurial.

I thought it’d be so, and indeed it was so. And it was painful. Having worked with DVCS’s like Mercurial and Git so much over the past couple of years, my brain was just not prepared to deal with CVS.

My solution? Take the old CVS tree, and attempt to make a Git repo out of it. Git I can handle.

And so I spent a number of hours trying to use cvs2git to convert my rsync’d mirror of the Mozilla CVS repository into something that I could browse with GitX.

“But why isn’t the CVS history in the Mercurial tree?” I hear you ask. And that’s a good question. It might have to do with the fact that converting the CVS history over is bloody hard – or at least that was my experience. cvs2git has the unfortunate habit of analyzing the entire repository / history and spitting out any errors or corruptions it found at the end.1 This is fine for small repositories, but the Mozilla CVS repo (even back in 1999) was quite substantial, and had quite a bit of history.

So my experience became: run cvs2git, wait 25 minutes, glare at an error message about corruption, scour the web for solutions to the issue, make random stabs at a solution, and repeat.

Not the greatest situation. I did what most people in my position would do, and cast my frustration into the cold, unfeeling void that is Twitter.

But, lo and behold, somebody on the other side of the planet was listening. Unfocused informed me that whoever created the gecko-dev Github mirror somehow managed to type in the black-magic incantations that would import all of the old CVS history into the Git mirror. I simply had to clone gecko-dev, and I was golden.

Thanks Unfocused. :)

So I had my tree. I cracked open Gitx, put some tea on, and started pouring through the commits from the initial creation of the docshell folder (October 15, 1999) to the last change in that folder just before the switch over to 2005 (December 15, 2004)2.

The following are my notes as I peered through those commits.

Artist’s rendering of me reading some old commit messages. I’m not claiming to have magic powers.

“First landing”

That’s the message for the first commit when the docshell/ folder was first created by Travis Bogard.

Without even looking at the code, that’s a pretty strange commit just by the message alone. No bug number, no reviewer, no approval, nothing even approximating a vague description of what was going on.

Leafing through these early commits, I was surprised to find that quite common. In fact, I learned that it was about a year after this work started that code review suddenly became mandatory for commits.

So, for these first bits of code, nobody seems to be reviewing it – or at least, nobody is signing off on it in commit messages.

Like I mentioned, the date for this commit is October 15, 1999. If the timeline in this Wikipedia article about the history of the Mozilla Suite is reliable, that puts us somewhere between Milestone 10 and Milestone 11 of the first 1.0 Mozilla Suite release.3

That means that at the time that this docshell/ folder was created, the Mozilla source code had been publicly available for over a year4, but nothing had been released from it yet.

Travis Bogard

Before we continue, who is this intrepid Travis Bogard who is spearheading this embedding initiative and the DocShell / WebShell rewrite?

At the time, according to his LinkedIn page, he worked for America Online (which at this point in time owned Netscape.5) He’d been working for AOL since 1996, working his way up the ranks from lowly intern all the way to Principal Software Engineer.

Travis was the one who originally wrote the wiki page about how painful it was embedding the web engine, and how unwieldy nsWebShell was.6 It was Travis who led the charge to strip away all of the complexity and mess inside of WebShell, and create smaller, more specialized interfaces for the behind the scenes DocShell class, which would carry out most of the work that WebShell had been doing up until that point.7

So, for these first few months, it was Travis who would be doing most of the work on DocShell.

Parallel development

These first few months, Travis puts the pedal to the metal moving things out of WebShell and into DocShell. Remember – the idea was to have a thin, simple nsWebBrowser that embedders could touch, and a fat, complex DocShell that was privately used within Gecko that was accessible via many small, specialized interfaces.

Wholesale replacing or refactoring a major part of the engine is no easy task, however – and since WebShell was core to the very function of the browser (and the mail/news client, and a bunch of other things), there were two copies of WebShell made.

The original WebShell existed in webshell/ under the root directory. The second WebShell, the one that would eventually replace it, existed under docshell/base. The one under docshell/base is the one that Travis was stripping down, but nobody was using it until it was stable. They’d continue using the one under webshell/, until they were satisfied with their implementation by both manual and automated testing.

When they were satisfied, they’d branch off of the main development line, and start removing occurances of WebShell where they didn’t need to be, and replace them with nsWebBrowser or DocShell where appropriate. When they were done that, they’d merge into main line, and celebrate!

At least, that was the plan.

That plan is spelled out here in the Plan of Attack for the redesign. That plan sketches out a rough schedule as well, and targets November 30th, 1999 as the completion point of the project.

This parallel development means that any bugs that get discovered in WebShell during the redesign needs to get fixed in two places – both under webshell/ and docshell/base.

Breaking up is so hard to do

So what was actually changing in the code? In Travis’ first commit, he adds the following interfaces:

along with some build files. Something interesting here is this nsIHTMLDocShell – where it looked like at this point, the plan was to have different DocShell interfaces depending on the type of document being displayed. Later on, we see this idea dissipate.

If DocShell was a person, these are its baby pictures. At this point, nsIDocShell has just two methods: LoadDocument, LoadDocumentVia, and a single nsIDOMDocument attribute for the document.

And here’s the interface for WebShell, which Travis was basing these new interfaces off of. Note that there’s no LoadDocument, or LoadDocumentVia, or an attribute for an nsIDOMDocument. So it seems this wasn’t just a straight-forward breakup into smaller interfaces – this was a rewrite, with new interfaces to replace the functionality of the old one.8

This is consistent with the remarks in this wikipage where it was mentioned that the new DocShell interfaces should have an API for the caller to supply a document, instead of a URI – thus taking the responsibility of calling into the networking library away from DocShell and putting it on the caller.

nsIDocShellEdit seems to be a replacement for some of the functions of the old nsIClipboardCommands methods that WebShell relied upon. Specifically, this interface was concerned with cutting, copying and pasting selections within the document. There is also a method for searching. These methods are all just stubbed out, and don’t do much at this point.

nsIDocShellFile seems to be the interface used for printing and saving documents.

nsIGenericWindow (which I believe is the ancestor of nsIBaseWindow), seems to be an interface that some embedding window must implement in order for the new nsWebBrowser / DocShell to be embedded in it. I think. I’m not too clear on this. At the very least, I think it’s supposed to be a generic interface for windows supplied by the underlying operating system.

nsIGlobalHistory is an interface for, well, browsing history. This was before tabs, so we had just a single, linear global history to maintain, and I guess that’s what this interface was for.

nsIScrollable is an interface for manipulating the scroll position of a document.

So these magnificent seven new interfaces were the first steps in breaking up WebShell… what was next?

Enter the Container

nsIDocShellContainer was created so that the DocShells could be formed into a tree and enumerated, and so that child DocShells could be named. It was introduced in this commit.

about:face

In this commit, only five days after the first landing, Travis appears to reverse the decision to pass the responsibility of loading the document onto the caller of DocShell. LoadDocument and LoadDocumentVia are replaced by LoadURI and LoadURIVia. Steve Clark (aka “buster”) is also added to the authors list of the nsIDocShell interface. It’s not clear to me why this decision was reversed, but if I had to guess, I’d say it proved to be too much of a burden on the callers to load all of the documents themselves. Perhaps they punted on that goal, and decided to tackle it again later (though I will point out that today’s nsIDocShell still has LoadURI defined in it).

First implementor

The first implementation of nsIDocShell showed up on October 25, 1999. It was nsHTMLDocShell, and with the exception of nsIGlobalHistory, it implemented all of the other interfaces that I listed in Travis’ first landing.

The base implementation

On October 25th, the stubs of a DocShell base implementation showed up in the repository. The idea, I would imagine, is that for each of the document types that Gecko can display, we’d have a DocShell implementation, and each of these DocShell implementations would inherit from this DocShell base class, and only override the things that they need specialized for their particular document type.

Later on, when the idea of having specialized DocShell implementations evaporates, this base class will end up being nsDocShell.cpp.

That same day, most of the methods were removed from the nsHTMLDocShell implementation, and nsHTMLDocShell was made to inherit from nsDocShellBase.

“Does not compile yet”

The message for this commit on October 27th, 1999 is pretty interesting. It reads:

added a bunch of initial implementation. does not compile yet, but that’s ok because docshell isn’t part of the build yet.

So not only are none of these patches being reviewed (as far as I can tell), and are not mapped to any bugs in the bug tracker, but the patches themselves just straight-up do not build. They are not building on tinderbox.

This is in pretty stark contrast to today’s code conventions. While it’s true that we might land code that is not entered for most Nightly users, we usually hide such code behind an about:config pref so that developers can flip it on to test it. And I think it’s pretty rare (if it ever occurs) for us to land code in mozilla-central that’s not immediately put into the build system.

Perhaps the WebShell tests that were part of the Plan of Attack were being written in parallel and just haven’t landed, but I suspect that they haven’t been written at all at this point. I suspect that the team was trying to stand something up and make it partially work, and then write tests for WebShell and try to make them pass for both old WebShell and DocShell. Or maybe just the latter.

These days, I think that’s probably how we’d go about such a major re-architecture / redesign / refactor; we’d write tests for the old component, land code that builds but is only entered via an about:config pref, and then work on porting the tests over to the new component. Once the tests pass for both, flip the pref for our Nightly users and let people test the new stuff. Once it feels stable, take it up the trains. And once it ships and it doesn’t look like anything is critically wrong with the new component, begin the process of removing the old component / tests and getting rid of the about:config pref.

Note that I’m not at all bashing Travis or the other developers who were working on this stuff back then – I’m simply remarking on how far we’ve come in terms of development practices.

Remember AOL keywords?

Tangentially, I’m seeing some patches go by that have to do with hooking up some kind of “Keyword” support to WebShell.

Remember those keywords? This was the pre-Google era where there were only a few simplistic search engines around, and people were still trying to solve discoverability of things on the web. Keywords was, I believe, AOL’s attempt at a solution.

You can read up on AOL Keywords here. I just thought it was interesting to find some Keywords support being written in here.

One DocShell to rule them all

Now that we have decided that there is only one docshell for all content types, we needed to get rid of the base class/ content type implementation. This checkin takes and moves the nsDocShellBase to be nsDocShell. It now holds the nsIHTMLDocShell stuff. This will be going away. nsCDocShell was created to replace the previous nsCHTMLDocShell.

This commit lands on November 12th (almost a month from the first landing), and is the point where the DocShell-implementation-per-document-type plan breaks down. nsDocShellBase gets renamed to nsDocShell, and the nsIHTMLDocShell interface gets moved into nsIDocShell.idl, where a comment above it indicates that the interface will soon go away.

We have nsCDocShell.idl, but this interface will eventually disappear as well.

[PORKJOCKEY]

So, this commit message on November 13th caught my eye:

pork jockey paint fixes. bug=18140, r=kmcclusk,pavlov

What the hell is a “pork jockey”? A quick search around, and I see yet another reference to it in Bugzilla on bug 14928. It seems to be some kind of project… or code name…

I eventually found this ancient wiki page that documents some of the language used in bugs on Bugzilla, and it has an entry for “pork jockey”: a pork jockey bug is a “bug for work needed on infrastructure/architecture”.

I mentioned this in #developers, and dmose (who was hacking on Mozilla code at the time), explained:

16:52 (dmose) mconley: so, porkjockeys
16:52 (mconley) let’s hear it
16:52 (dmose) mconley: at some point long ago, there was some infrastrcture work that needed to happen
16:52 mconley flips on tape recorder
16:52 (dmose) and when people we’re talking about it, it seemed very hard to carry off
16:52 (dmose) somebody said that that would happen on the same day he saw pigs fly
16:53 (mconley) ah hah
16:53 (dmose) so ultimately the group of people in charge of trying to make that happen were…
16:53 (dmose) the porkjockeys
16:53 (dmose) which was the name of the mailing list too

Here’s the e-mail that Brendan Eich sent out to get the Porkjockey’s flying.

Development play-by-play

On November 17th, the nsIGenericWindow interface was removed because it was being implemented in widget/base/nsIBaseWindow.idl.

On November 27th, nsWebShell started to implement nsIBaseWindow, which helped pull a bunch of methods out of the WebShell implementations.

On November 29th, nsWebShell now implements nsIDocShell – so this seems to be the first point where the DocShell work gets brought into code paths that might be hit. This is particularly interesting, because he makes this change to both the WebShell implementation that he has under the docshell/ folder, as well as the WebShell implementation under the webshell/ folder. This means that some of the DocShell code is now actually being used.

On November 30th, Travis lands a patch to remove some old commented out code. The commit message mentions that the nsIDocShellEdit and nsIDocShellFile interfaces introduced in the first landing are now defunct. It doesn’t look like anything is diving in to replace these interfaces straight away, so it looks like he’s just not worrying about it just yet. The defunct interfaces are removed in this commit one day later.

On December 1st, WebShell (both the fork and the “live” version) is made to implement nsIDocShellContainer.

One day later, nsIDocShellTreeNode interface is added to replace nsIDocShellContainer. The interface is almost identical to nsIDocShellContainer, except that it allows the caller to access child DocShells at particular indices as opposed to just returning an enumerator.

December 3rd was a very big day! Highlights include:

Noticing something? A lot of these changes are getting dumped straight into the live version of WebShell (under the webshell/ directory). That’s not really what the Plan of Attack had spelled out, but that’s what appears to be happening. Perhaps all of this stuff was trivial enough that it didn’t warrant waiting for the WebShell fork to switch over.

On December 12th, nsIDocShellTreeOwner is introduced.

On December 15th, buster re-lands the nsIDocShellEdit and nsIDocShellFile interfaces that were removed on November 30th, but they’re called nsIContentViewerEdit and nsIContentViewerFile, respectively. Otherwise, they’re identical.

On December 17th, WebShell becomes a subclass of DocShell. This means that a bunch of things can get removed from WebShell, since they’re being taken care of by the parent DocShell class. This is a pretty significant move in the whole “replacing WebShell” strategy.

Similar work occurs on December 20th, where even more methods inside WebShell start to forward to the base DocShell class.

That’s the last bit of notable work during 1999. These next bits show up in the new year, and provides further proof that we didn’t all blow up during Y2K.

On Feburary 2nd, 2000, a new interface called nsIWebNavigation shows up. This interface is still used to this day to navigate a browser, and to get information about whether it can go “forwards” or “backwards”.

On February 8th, a patch lands that makes nsGlobalWindow deal entirely in DocShells instead of WebShells. nsIScriptGlobalObject also now deals entirely with DocShells. This is a pretty big move, and the patch is sizeable.

On February 11th, more methods are removed from WebShell, since the refactorings and rearchitecture have made them obsolete.

On February 14th, for Valentine’s day, Travis lands a patch to have DocShell implement the nsIWebNavigation interface. Later on, he lands a patch that relinquishes further control from WebShell, and puts the DocShell in control of providing the script environment and providing the nsIScriptGlobalObjectOwner interface. Not much later, he lands a patch that implements the Stop method from the nsIWebNavigation interface for DocShell. It’s not being used yet, but it won’t be long now. Valentine’s day was busy!

On February 24th, more stuff (like the old Stop implementation) gets gutted from WebShell. Some, if not all, of those methods get forwarded to the underlying DocShell, unsurprisingly.

Similar story on February 29th, where a bunch of the scroll methods are gutted from WebShell, and redirected to the underlying DocShell. This one actually has a bug and some reviewers!9 Travis also landed a patch that gets DocShell set up to be able to create its own content viewers for various documents.

March 10th saw Travis gut plenty of methods from WebShell and redirect to DocShell instead. These include Init, SetDocLoaderObserver, GetDocLoaderObserver, SetParent, GetParent, GetChildCount, AddChild, RemoveChild, ChildAt, GetName, SetName, FindChildWithName, SetChromeEventHandler, GetContentViewer, IsBusy, SetDocument, StopBeforeRequestingURL, StopAfterURLAvailable, GetMarginWidth, SetMarginWidth, GetMarginHeight, SetMarginHeight, SetZoom, GetZoom. A few follow-up patches did something similar. That must have been super satisfying.

March 11th, Travis removes the Back, Forward, CanBack and CanForward methods from WebShell. Consumers of those can use the nsIWebNavigation interface on the DocShell instead.

March 30th sees the nsIDocShellLoadInfo interface show up. This interface is for “specifying information used in a nsIDocShell::loadURI call”. I guess this is certainly better than adding a huge amount of arguments to ::loadURI.

During all of this, I’m seeing references to a “new session history” being worked on. I’m not really exploring session history (at this point), so I’m not highlighting those commits, but I do want to point out that a replacement for the old Netscape session history stuff was underway during all of this DocShell business, and the work intersected quite a bit.

On April 16th, Travis lands a commit that takes yet another big chunk out of WebShell in terms of loading documents and navigation. The new session history is now being used instead of the old.

The last 10% is the hardest part

We’re approaching what appears to be the end of the DocShell work. According to his LinkedIn profile, Travis left AOL in May 2000. His last commit to the repository before he left was on April 24th. Big props to Travis for all of the work he put in on this project – by the time he left, WebShell was quite a bit simpler than when he started. I somehow don’t think he reached the end state that he had envisioned when he’d written the original redesign document – the work doesn’t appear to be done. WebShell is still around (in fact, parts of it around were around until only recently!10 ). Still, it was a hell of chunk of work he put in.

And if I’m interpreting the rest of the commits after this correctly, there is a slow but steady drop off in large architectural changes, and a more concerted effort to stabilize DocShell, nsWebBrowser and nsWebShell. I suspect this is because everybody was buckling down trying to ship the first version of the Mozilla Suite (which finally occurred June 5th, 2002 – still more than 2 years down the road).

There are still some notable commits though. I’ll keep listing them off.

On June 22nd, a developer called “rpotts” lands a patch to remove the SetDocument method from DocShell, and to give the implementation / responsibility of setting the document on implementations of nsIContentViewer.

July 5th sees rpotts move the new session history methods from nsIWebNavigation to a new interface called nsIDocShellHistory. It’s starting to feel like the new session history is really heating up.

On July 18th, a developer named Judson Valeski lands a large patch with the commit message “webshell-docshell consolodation changes”. Paraphrasing from the bug, the point of this patch is to move WebShell into the DocShell lib to reduce the memory footprint. This also appears to be a lot of cleanup of the DocShell code. Declarations are moved into header files. The nsDocShellModule is greatly simplified with some macros. It looks like some dead code is removed as well.

On November 9th, a developer named “disttsc” moves the nsIContentViewer interface from the webshell folder to the docshell folder, and converts it from a manually created .h to an .idl. The commit message states that this work is necessary to fix bug 46200, which was filed to remove nsIBrowserInstance (according to that bug, nsIBrowserInstance must die).

That’s probably the last big, notable change to DocShell during the 2000′s.

2001: A DocShell Odyssey

On March 8th, a developer named “Dan M” moves the GetPersistence and SetPersistence methods from nsIWebBrowserChrome to nsIDocShellTreeOwner. He sounds like he didn’t really want to do it, or didn’t want to be pegged with the responsibility of the decision – the commit message states “embedding API review meeting made me do it.” This work was tracked in bug 69918.

On April 16th, Judson Valeski makes it so that the mimetypes that a DocShell can handle are not hardcoded into the implementation. Instead, handlers can be registered via the CategoryManager. This work was tracked in bug 40772.

On April 26th, a developer named Simon Fraser adds an implementation of nsISimpleEnumerator for DocShells. This implementation is called, unsurprisingly, nsDocShellEnumerator. This was for bug 76758. A method for retrieving an enumerator is added one day later in a patch that fixes a number of bugs, all related to the page find feature.

April 27th saw the first of the NSPR logging for DocShell get added to the code by a developer named Chris Waterson. Work for that was tracked in bug 76898.

On May 16th, for bug 79608, Brian Stell landed a getter and setter for the character set for a particular DocShell.

There’s a big gap here, where the majority of the landings are relatively minor bug fixes, cleanup, or only slightly related to DocShell’s purpose, and not worth mentioning.11

And beyond the infinite…

On January 8th, 2002, for bug 113970, Stephen Walker lands a patch that takes yet another big chunk out of WebShell, and added this to the nsIWebShell.h header:

/**
 * WARNING WARNING WARNING WARNING WARNING WARNING WARNING WARNING !!!!
 *
 * THIS INTERFACE IS DEPRECATED. DO NOT ADD STUFF OR CODE TO IT!!!!
 */

I’m actually surprised it too so long for something like this to get added to the nsIWebShell interface – though perhaps there was a shared understanding that nsIWebShell was shrinking, and such a notice wasn’t really needed.

On January 9th, 2003 (yes, a whole year later – I didn’t find much worth mentioning in the intervening time), I see the first reference to “deCOMtamination”, which is an effort to reduce the amount of XPCOM-style code being used. You can read up more on deCOMtamination here.

On January 13th, 2003, Nisheeth Ranjan lands a patch to use “machine learning” in order to order results in the urlbar autocomplete list. I guess this was the precursor to the frencency algorithm that the AwesomeBar uses today? Interestingly, this code was backed out again on February 21st, 2003 for reasons that aren’t immediately clear – but it looks like, according to this comment, the code was meant to be temporary in order to gather “weights” from participants in the Mozilla 1.3 beta, which could then be hard-coded into the product. The machine-learning bug got closed on June 25th, 2009 due to AwesomeBar and frecency.

On Februrary 11th, 2004, the onbeforeunload event is introduced.

On April 17, 2004, gerv lands the first of several patches to switch the licensing of the code over to the MPL/LGPL/GPL tri-license. That’d be MPL 1.1.

On July 7th, 2004, timeless lands a patch that makes it so that embedders can disable all plugins in a document.

On November 23rd, 2004, the parent and treeOwner attributes for nsIDocShellTreeItem are made scriptable. They are read-only for script.

On December 8th, 2004, bz lands a patch that makes DocShell inherit from DocLoader, and starts a move to eliminate nsIWebShell, nsIWebShellContainer, and nsIDocumentLoader.

And that’s probably the last notable patch related to DocShell in 2004.

Lord of the rings

Reading through all of these commits in the docshell/ and webshell/ folders is a bit like taking a core sample of a very mature tree, and reading its rings. I can see some really important events occurring as I flip through these commits – from the very birth of Mozilla, to the birth of XPCOM and XUL, to porkjockeys, and the start of the embedding efforts… all the way to the splitting out of Thunderbird, deCOMtamination and introduction of the MPL. I really got a sense of the history of the Mozilla project reading through these commits.

I feel like I’m getting a better and better sense of where DocShell came from, and why it does what it does. I hope if you’re reading this, you’re getting that same sense.

Stay tuned for the next bit, where I look at years 2005 to 2010.

4 people like this post.

  1. Messages like: ERROR: A CVS repository cannot contain both cvsroot/mozilla/browser/base/content/metadata.js,v and cvsroot/mozilla/browser/base/content/Attic/metadata.js,v, for example 

  2. Those commits have hashes 575e116287f99fbe26f54ca3f3dbda377002c5e7 and  60567bb185eb8eea80b9ab08d8695bb27ba74e15 if you want to follow along at home. 

  3. Mozilla Suite 1.0 eventually ships on June 5th, 2002 

  4. According to Mozilla’s timeline, the source code was posted publicly on March 31st, 1998 

  5. According to Wikipedia, Netscape was purchased by AOL on March 17, 1999 

  6. That wiki page was first posted on October 8th, 1999 – exactly a week before the first docshell work had started. 

  7. I should point out that there is no mention of this embedding work in the first roadmap that was published for the Mozilla project. It was only in the second roadmap, published almost a year after the DocShell work began, that embedding was mentioned, albeit briefly. 

  8. More clues as to what WebShell was originally intended for are also in that interface file:

    /**
     * The web shell is a container for implementations of nsIContentViewer.
     * It is a content-viewer-container and also knows how to delegate certain
     * behavior to an nsIWebShellContainer.
     *
     * Web shells can be arranged in a tree.
     *
     * Web shells are also nsIWebShellContainer's because they can contain
     * other web shells.
     */
    

    So that helps clear things up a bit. I think. 

  9. travis reviewed it, and the patch was approved by rickg. Not sure what approval meant back then… was that like a super review? 

  10. This is the last commit to the webshell folder before it got removed on September 30th, 2010. 

  11. Hopefully I didn’t miss anything interesting in there! 

Bugnotes

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been experimenting with taking notes on the bugs I’ve been fixing in Evernote.

I’ve always taken notes on my bugs, but usually in some disposable text file that gets tossed away once the bug is completed.

Evernote gives me more powers, like embedded images, checkboxes, etc. It’s really quite nice, and it lets me export to HTML.

Now that I have these notes, I thought it might be interesting to share them. If I have notes on a bug, here’s what I’m going to aim to do when the bug is closed:

  • Publish my notes on my new Bugnotes site1
  • Comment in the bug linking to my notes
  • Add a “bugnotes” tag to my comment with the link

I’ve just posted my first bugnote. It’s raw, unedited, and probably a little hard to follow if you don’t know what I’m working on. I thought maybe it’d be interesting to see what’s going on in my head as I fix a bug. And who knows, if somebody needs to re-investigate a bug or a related bug down the line, these notes might save some people some time.

Anyhow, here are my bugnotes. And if you’re interested in doing something similar, you can fork it (I’m using Jekyll for static site construction).

1 person likes this post.

  1. I didn’t want to pollute this blog with them (plus, dumping these files into WordPress seemed to be a bit heavy)  

DocShell in a Nutshell – Part 1: Original Intents

I think in order to truly understand what the DocShell currently is, we have to find out where the idea of creating it came from. That means going way, way back to its inception, and figuring out what its original purpose was.

So I’ve gone back, peered through various archived wiki pages, newsgroup and mailing list posts, and I think I’ve figured out that original purpose.1

The original purpose can be, I believe, summed up in a single word: embedding.

Embedding

Back in the late 90′s, sometime after the Mozilla codebase was open-sourced, it became clear to some folks that the web was “going places”. It was the “bees knees”. It was the “cat’s pajamas”. As such, it was likely that more and more desktop applications were going to need to be able to access and render web content.

The thing is, accessing and rendering web content is hard. Really hard. One does not simply write web browsing capabilities into their application from scratch hoping for the best. Heartbreak is in that direction.

Instead, the idea was that pre-existing web engines could be embedded into other applications. For example, Steam, Valve’s game distribution platform, displays a ton of web content in its user interface. All of those Steam store pages? Those are web pages! They’re using an embedded web engine in order to display that stuff.2

So making Gecko easily embeddable was, at the time, a real goal, and a real project.

nsWebShell

The problem was that embedding Gecko was painful. The top-level component that embedders needed to instantiate and communicate with was called “nsWebShell”, and it was a pretty unwieldy. Lots of internal knowledge about the internal workings of Gecko was leaked through the nsWebShell component, and it’s interface changed far too often.

It was also inefficient – the nsWebShell didn’t just represent the top-level “thing that loads web content”. Instances of nsWebShell were also used recursively for subdocuments within those documents – for example, (i)frames within a webpage. These nested nsWebShell’s formed a tree. That’s all well and good, except for the fact that there were things that the nsWebShell loaded or did that only the top-level nsWebShell really needed to load or do. So there was definitely room for some performance improvement.

In order to correct all of these issues, a plan was concocted to retire nsWebShell in favour of several new components and a slew of new interfaces. Two of those new components were nsDocShell and nsWebBrowser.

nsWebBrowser

nsWebBrowser would be the thing that embedders would drop into the applications – it would be the browser, and would do all of the loading / doing of things that only the top-level web browser needed to do.

The interface for nsWebBrowser would be minimal, just exposing enough so that an embedder could drop one into their application with little fuss, point it at a URL, set up some listeners, and watch it dance.

nsDocShell

nsDocShell would be… well, everything else that nsWebBrowser wasn’t. So that dumping ground that was nsWebShell would get dumped into nsDocShell instead. However, a number of new, logically separated interfaces would be created for nsDocShell.

Examples of those interfaces were:

  • nsIDocShell
  • nsIDocShellTreeItem
  • nsIDocShellTreeNode
  • nsIWebNavigation
  • nsIWebProgress
  • nsIBaseWindow
  • nsIScrollable
  • nsITextScroll
  • nsIContentViewerContainer
  • nsIInterfaceRequestor
  • nsIScriptGlobalObjectOwner
  • nsIRefreshURI

So instead of a gigantic, ever changing interface, you had lots of smaller interfaces, many of which could eventually be frozen over time (which is good for embedders).

These interfaces also made it possible to shield embedders from various internals of the nsDocShell component that embedders shouldn’t have to worry about.

Ok, but… what was it?

But I still haven’t answered the question – what was the DocShell at this point? What was it supposed to do now that it was created.

This ancient wiki page spells it out nicely:

This class is responsible for initiating the loading and viewing of a document.

This document also does a good job of describing what a DocShell is and does.

Basically, any time a document is to be viewed, a DocShell needs to be created to view it. We create the DocShell, and then we point that DocShell at the URL, and it does the job of kicking off communications via the network layer, and dealing with the content once it comes back.

So it’s no wonder that it was (and still is!) a dumping ground – when it comes to loading and displaying content, nsDocShell is the central nexus point of communications for all components that make that stuff happen.

I believe that was the original purpose of nsDocShell, anyhow.

And why “shell”?

This is a simple question that has been on my mind since I started this. What does the “shell” mean in nsDocShell?

Y’know, I think it’s actually a fragment left over from the embedding work, and that it really has no meaning anymore. Originally, nsWebShell was the separation point between an embedder and the Gecko web engine – so I think I can understand what “shell” means in that context – it’s the touch-point between the embedder, and the embedee.

I think nsDocShell was given the “shell” monicker because it did the job of taking over most of nsWebShell’s duties. However, since nsWebBrowser was now the touch-point between the embedder and embedee… maybe shell makes less sense. I wonder if we missed an opportunity to name nsDocShell something better.

In some ways, “shell” might make some sense because it is the separation between various documents (the root document, any sibling documents, and child documents)… but I think that’s a bit of a stretch.

But now I’m racking my brain for a better name (even though a rename is certainly not worth it at this point), and I can’t think of one.

What would you rename it, if you had the chance?

What is nsDocShell doing now?

I’m not sure what’s happened to nsDocShell over the years, and that’s the point of the next few posts in this series. I’m going to be going through the commits hitting nsDocShell from 1999 until the present day to see how nsDocShell has changed and evolved.

Hold on to your butts.

Further reading

The above was gleaned from the following sources:

6 people like this post.

  1. I’m very much prepared to be wrong about any / all of this. I’m making assertions and drawing conclusions by reading and interpreting things that other people have written about DocShell – and if the telephone game is any indication, this indirect analysis can be lossy. If I have misinterpreted, misunderstood, or completely missed the point in any of the above, please don’t hesitate to comment, and I will correct it forthwith. 

  2. They happen to be using WebKit, the same web engine that powers Safari, and (until recently) Chromium. According to this, they’re using the Chromium Embedding Framework to display this web content. There are a number of applications that embed Gecko. Firefox is the primary consumer of Gecko. Thunderbird is another obvious one – when you display HTML email, it’s using the Gecko web engine in order to lay it out and display it. WINE uses Gecko to allow Windows-binaries to browse the web. Making your web engine embeddable, however, has a development cost, and over the years, making Gecko embeddable seems to have become less of a priority. Servo is a next-generation web browser engine from Mozilla Research that aims to be embeddable. 

Alice in DocShell Land

I’ve been reading a book called The Annotated Alice. In this book, the late and great Martin Gardner shows us the stories of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass but supplies copious footnotes to illustrate the puns, wordplay, allusions, logic problems and satire going on beneath the text. Some of these footnotes delve into pure conjecture (there are still people to this day who theorize about various aspects of the stories), and other footnotes show quite clearly that Carrol wrote these stories with a sophisticated wit and whimsy that isn’t immediately obvious at first glance.

And it’s clear that Gardner (and others like him) have spent hours upon hours thinking and theorizing about these stories. A purposeful misspelling gets awarded a two page footnote here, and a mention of a mirror sends us off talking about matter and anti-matter and other matters (ha) of quantum physics.

So much thinking and effort to interpret these stories, and what you get out of it is a fascinating tapestry of ideas and history.

Needless to say, I’ve been finding the whole thing fascinating. It’s a hell of a read.

While reading it, I’ve wondered what it’d be like to apply the same practice to source code. Take some relatively mysterious piece of source code that only a few people feel comfortable with, and explode it out. Go through the source control history, and all of the old bugs, and see where this code came from. What was its purpose to begin with? What is its purpose now? What are the battle scars?

After much thinking, I’ve decided to try this, and I’m going to try it on a piece of Gecko called “DocShell”.

I think I just heard Ms2ger laughing somewhere.

It’s become pretty clear having talked to a few seasoned Mozilla hackers that DocShell is not well understood. The wiki page on it makes that even more clear – it starts:

The goal of this page is to serve as a dumping/organization ground for docshell docs. When someone finds out something, it should be added here in a reasonable way. By the time this gets unwieldy, hopefully we will have enough material for several actual docs on what docshell does and why.

So, I’m going to attempt to figure out what DocShell was supposed to do, and figure out what it currently does. I’m going to dig through source code, old bugs, and old CVS commits, back to the point where Netscape first open-sourced the Mozilla code-base.

It’s not going to be easy. It’s definitely going to be a multiple month, multiple post effort. I’m likely to get things wrong, or only partially correct. I’ll need help in those cases, so please comment.

And I might not succeed in figuring out what DocShell was supposed to do. But I’m pretty confident I can get a grasp on what it currently does.

So in the end, if I’m lucky, we’ll end up with a few things:

  1. A greater shared understanding of DocShell
  2. Materials that can be used to flesh out the DocShell wiki
  3. Better inline documentation for DocShell maybe?

I’ve also asked bz to forward me feedback requests for DocShell patches, so that way I get another angle of attack on understanding the code.

So, deep breath. Here goes. Watch this space.

5 people like this post.

Australis Performance Post-mortem Summary

Over the last few months, I’ve been talking about all of the work we put into making Australis feel fast when it shipped in Firefox 29.

I talked about where we started with our performance work, and how we grappled with the ts_paint and tpaint performance (“talos”) tests. After that, I talked a bit about the excellent tools we have (and ones we developed ourselves) to make finding our performance bottlenecks easier.

After a brief delay, I rounded out the series by talking about our tab animation performance work, and the customization transition performance work.

I think over the course of working on these things, I’ve learned quite a bit about performance work in general. If I had to distill it down to a few tidbits, it’d be:

  • Measure first to get a baseline, then try to improve. (Alternatively, “you can’t improve what you can’t measure”)
  • Finding the solutions to performance problems is usually the easy part. The hard part is finding and isolating the problems to begin with.
  • While performance work can be a bit of a grind, users do feel and appreciate the efforts. It’s totally worth it.

So that’s it on the series. Enjoy your zippy Firefox!

6 people like this post.